Archive for February, 2006

Libertà ?

Tuesday, February 21st, 2006

Da tempo seguo alcuni blog di persone che si interessano di libertà digitale, la questione è abbastanza calda e ovviamente mai reclamizzata in TV o nei giornali.
Non ultima la Direttiva 2004/48 CE che è stata approvata in gran segreto per ovvi motivi. Primo tra tutti la travisazione nei punti chiave della Direttiva stessa. Infatti essa permettere azioni giudiziarie repressive contro providers i cui utenti saranno ritenuti colpevoli di violazione del diritto di autore sulla base di semplici supposizioni, senza alcun riscontro oggettivo.
Inoltre se qualcuno decide che violate una proprietà intellettuale (confusa appositamente con la proprietà industriale) ed innesca attraverso la magistratura un provvedimento restrittivo di urgenza che poi si rivela senza fondamento non è previsto alcun risarcimento o alcuna rivalsa.
Tale possibilità era prevista nella direttiva europea, ma è stranamente scomparsa dal recepimento approvato in Italia in gran segreto.

Java open source stuff

Tuesday, February 21st, 2006

Java source is a site where you can find many open source Java libraries organized by category.

Call to Action for all RIFE-ers and not

Monday, February 20th, 2006

The RIFE framework lead developer just posted a blog post asking user feedback for the best/easiest/more-intuitive way to implement the templating for RIFE. I’d go with regular tags because IDE’s support them, but I must say that the Velocity and Tapestry approach looks interesting as well. I can’t say I like neither the current nor the processing instruction variant syntax, am I missing out something?
My objection to Velocity/Tapestry/FreeMarker and other alternative approaches is that IDE’s don’t offer as good support as JSP taglibs or JSF. These communities should try to extend the eclipse WTP editor and NetBeans in order to speed up the syntax learning path.
It will be interesting also to see what new syntax will JSP 2.1 introduce to ease integration with JSF as well.

Java blog communities

Monday, February 20th, 2006

These are some main Java blogging communities. If you know of any other the you think it’s important, please comment and I’ll add it to the list. Thank you! 🙂
Java.net Weblogs
Planet JDK
JRoller

Struts evolution

Sunday, February 19th, 2006

My first impact with the MVC concept was through the book by Hans Bergsten JavaServer Pages. Without realizing it I had a working MVC framework that did it’s part in getting me a excellent grade on my Web Application exam, and that makes you think and note even subtle differences between what’s out there. Then an opportunity came out to build a real-world money-making J2EE app and I hopped aboard. The choice was made to lean on the Struts framework 1.2.x which was fine by me because I always wanted to go deeper in it’s architecture to better understand it and to improve my own framework (no pretensions here, I did it for fun, not because I thought it was better).
FFD to this day. Today you can see many new things coming into place; Beehive builds on top of Struts and brings in the concept of Page Flow and Components and uses annotations, however there’s some clunky code gen that needs to be done as well. Spring MVC does some incredible things in keeping stuff framework-agnostic and allows various ways to generate content (one nasty thing about Struts is that it always needs a mapping as an endpoint, that means you can’t map to null and use the response object to spit out stuff like pdf’s, which might be a bad idea anyway as that should be the View’s responsibility but if you’re in the view you can’t take use of Strut’s mappings to go to an error endpoint) and also plans introducing the Spring WebFlow package. A strong feature about it is that they started from the beginning on focusing on the interfaces so they aren’t locked in on extending an Action like Struts and they support the use of the domain model instead of the form beans that you’d use with Struts.
In the mean time another MVC framework has also gain attention and it’s called WebWork. Infact, it features many of the strong sides of Spring MVC and adds some more (latest cool stuff is with including ajax stuff thanks to dojo) which is why the Stuts people have sit down with the WebWork people and decided that the next generation of request based Struts (they have a component JSF-based offer as well called Shale) will be based on WebWork.
In the mean time, classic Stuts is still being developed and it’s going in it’s 1.3 incarnation that’s about to land on us. They’ve included the commons-chain library that gave them a better way to re-implement the RequestProcessor thanks to the Chain of Responsibility design pattern. Other very important thing is that you don’t have to extend org.apache.struts.action.Action anymore but you can focus on implementing the Command interface and a added bonus you can map a chain in your struts xml configuration file. I really missed the idea of a chain in Struts 1.2.x so this is a very compelling reason to switch.
The article features also a way of grouping more actions in one (like CRUD stuff in a DispatchAction).
All in all I found this article at infonoia very interesting and I can’t wait to see what interesting subject they’ll include soon.

OSGi and Web applications

Sunday, February 19th, 2006

This article demonstrates a innovative way to use the OSGi framework within a Web application. I belive the force of OSGi to provide a clean plug-in approach to application development could lead to a whole new approach to mantainence and development of J2EE apps (I think there is also a .Net implementation of OSGi so that could go for ASP.NET as well). Potentially you could dynamicly extend/change your web-app on the fly. Something that it’s very hard to do today and it would lead to easy extendibility of your application having some clean point cuts on how do they fit together.

IE colpisce ancora all’insegna degli eventi

Saturday, February 18th, 2006

Ti pareva che IE funzionasse? sembra che sia IE 6, che IE 7 beta siano afflitte da questo bel bug : se usate onchange (codice statico non generato dinamicamente) per eseguire delle operazioni alla fine della funzione il focus rimane sull’oggetto chiamante creando quindi uno specie di loop da cui non potete uscire. Per risolvere invece di usare onchange ho usato onblur, sicuramente non è il massimo ma non sono riuscito a risolvere. C’è una possibile soluzione su questo sito ma con il mio browser non ha funzionato.
Gironzolando quindi per la rete alla ricerca di possibili soluzioni mi sono imbattuto in vari siti Javascript; posto qui di seguito quelli che ho trovato più interessanti :

La via più veloce per trovare risorse in Internet

Saturday, February 18th, 2006

E questo quello che promettono i gestori del sito www.listible.com, un sito ancora in versione beta che sfrutta il social bookmarking per creare liste di ogni tipo potenzialmente utili a scovare quello che altri navigatori hanno trovato interessante sulla rete.

Il sito è in lingua inglese ma merita senza dubbio una visita.

Link di riferimento: http://www.listible.com/

Ycarus Gentoo ebuild

Saturday, February 11th, 2006

vedi http://gentoo.zugaina.org/

Costruire un server con Mac Mini

Saturday, February 11th, 2006

Volete crearvi un server in casa, tutto sulla vostra scrivania? Allora i Mac Mini sono la soluzione che fa per voi, ed i risultati possono essere molto professionali. Basta un investimento, una discreta manualità, tanto coraggio e questo tutorial completo.